Fifeshire

Ship Details:

Ship Name: FifeshireFifeshire
Ship Information:
Barque, 557 tons old measure / 488 tons new measure, Built at Sunderland by Phillip Laing in 1841 for owner, J, Pirie of London. Launched on the 22nd of May 1841, she was sent to London to take the first immigrants to Nelson N Z in September of that year, arriving at Nelson on 1st February 1842. Being the first ship in port, she was also the first to leave and ran aground on Arrow Rock on 27th Feb, and in the process breaking her back. It was 4 years before the remains were removed. Several small ships were constructed from her timbers but no record of them has been found. The font at St Thomas’s church, Motueka was made from the main mast and the anchor chain was used in the construction of a road bridge on the Waiwakaiho River in 1842 and later on reused on the North Island Waitere railway viaduct built by Anderson Bros of Christchurch in the 1870’s, but other than the captain’s megaphone (held by the Nelson Provincial Museum) and a chair supposedly made from the ship,( now at Broadgreen House, Stoke), nothing else remains. A bridge in Bridge or Hardy Street and a small office or two were made from the wreck but have not survived.

Voyage Details:

Voyage Name:Fifeshire
Tonnage:557
Departure Port:West India Docks
Destination Port:Nelson
NZC Ref:34/2, pp.136-50
Examiner Ref:
Voyage Information:
Captain H Arnold master. William Spence surgeon. West India Docks. Sailed from Deal 26 September 1841.

Passengers on The Voyage:

SurnameFirst NameAge on ArrivalProfession
AllenEdward William35carpenter
AllenBetsy37wife
AllenBetsy11child
AllenEliza7child
Allen (Herrick)Joseph John11child
Allen (Herrick)John15carpenter
BerryThomas Richard25brush maker
BerryRebecca Keysley19wife
BirdAnn25wife
BirdAnne1child
BirdReuben28carpenter
BirdMary Not listed
BurtonJohn28agricultural labourer
BurtonMaria28wife
CarterLucy30wife
CarterRobert2child
CarterRobert30agricultural labourer
CarterEmma died on board
ClemensEdward18baker
Cleverley  died on board
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